About Duckie

Author, Coach, Celebrant, Life Transition Adviser.

Almost there

Great. I have just put the full stop at the end of another story, except that I haven’t finished. There is still a scene in the middle to write, but at least I know how it ends. Does anyone else write like that, sliding backwards and forwards through the story?

I read like that as well, which is one advantage of physical as opposed to e-books. I start at the front and get to know the protagonists and get the scene and plot established and then I often jump around, reading a bit here and a bit there. I may read the end and then go back and fill in all the gaps. Mostly the entire book gets read in the end. It’s not a very disciplined way of reading I know, but it suits my flibberty-gibbert brain.

This one is a short story to be included in an anthology to be published by Steam E-Reads, promoting their authors.  Well, it’s supposed to be short but I am already running over the maximum word count so some strict editing is in order.  Still, it has been fun to write and I like to think that it’s an improvement on my last.  Hope the readers think so too. It is set in a coastal town and in my mind, it’s located in the vicinity of Robe, one of my favourite seaside places to stay.

2001 West Beach web

Errands to run now but I feel that I have jumped a big hurdle with the ending. Perhaps tonight I can fill in the rest. Does this mirror your experiences as well?

Flying by the seat of my pants

I love the way that characters develop a life and personality of their own.  Sure we create them initially, but at that point we probably don’t fully understand their attitudes, their sense of humour or how they are likely to react in any given situation.  We don’t know what they are going to do next.  As I sit in front of that sheet of paper or the keyboard, these people develop motivations of their own and I am constantly surprised at what they do.  I am there to keep them focussed, but take their directional journey with them.

That’s not to say that the characters have full rein, as I know in general terms what their purpose is within the story – each character is there for a reason – but I draw the stick figure and the story fleshes that person out.  I enjoy getting to know them as the story progresses.

Some stories flow easier than others and The Red Heart was one of those.  It helped that I had lived for many years in Alice Springs and also that this was where I learnt to fly.  I knew the country from the air, I knew the characters and of course I knew the technicalities of flying.

Today, there are many women who make aviation their career but at the time in which this story was set, there were still barriers to women as pilots.  The attitudes encountered by Kathy were very real.  It is a real buzz for me now therefore to get onto a commercial flight, knowing that there is a woman on the flight deck.

I don’t know where Kathy is now, but perhaps she has progressed to the flight deck, still using Alice Springs as her home base, or perhaps she has settled on Mulga Downs with a brood of young jackaroos and jillaroos.  What do you think she would have done?

keyboard-hands