In Full Flight

As publication gets closer, I am finally able to reveal the new cover for The Red Heart. I’m thrilled with it, and the cover certainly has that Australian flavour, which was important to me. Looking at it, you can see that aviation features in some way as well.

The official launch date for the book will be 30 May 2018. It will be available from your favourite online book retailers at a cost of $3.99.  Print books will be available at $16.00 and can also be ordered from this site.

Details about the book are available on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/Emily_Hussey. For those on my mailing list, advance copies are available at books2read.com/u/bOAroQ.  Copies won’t be available via Amazon until the 30th May.

Reviews are the lifeblood of any author, particularly a new author like myself. If you are able to leave a review on any of the platforms, that would be wonderful.

Autumn Reflections

I love Autumn. It’s a time when the weather is tolerable, and the days conducive to getting out for walks or exploring. Best of all, the long dark nights haven’t begun.

This weekend, I took a break from writing and took a train trip to Clunes in NW Victoria. Each year, the village stages a book fair, complete with guest authors and various writing events. The main street is closed, and marquees down the centre accommodate books on every topic imaginable.

The town businesses support the event, with many of them adopting book-related activities for the weekend. That’s astute, because there are thousands of visitors to this normally quiet town. Strolling to the outskirts of the village, I walked along the creek that runs through the town. Here you can see the local shades of autumn.

Clunes Autumn Creed

Autumn reflections

Much as I enjoyed browsing the books, I really enjoyed the train journey there and back. I eschewed the car, opting instead to ride the rails. It was great. I could relax, read, think, and watch the passing scenery. A change in trains was required at Ballarat station, with enough time to appreciate the historic station and partake of refreshments at the station cafeteria.  Sitting over a cup of tea, I felt as though I was in an English novel; the building had that sort of feel to it.

Autumn didn’t exist in my time living in Alice Springs. Sure, the length of days changed and the weather became milder, but there wasn’t the change in colour that I’ve enjoyed on recent excursions. It was a vista of strong colours; strong blue skies, and the reds and browns of the earth. The vegetation was in more muted shades, but none of it in autumn tones.

This was what Kathy Sullivan discovered when she moved to Alice Springs for work. It was a challenging environment for a young city woman, but introduced to it through the eyes of others, she grew to love it as well. Think Albert Namatjira, for this was his country.

With formatting and print preparation in train, I expect The Red Heart to be released very shortly, but by the end of this week, I will be revealing the cover. Then you can see the colours for yourself.

Evolution of The Red Heart

In the years I lived in Alice Springs, it never occurred to me to write a book based in that location.  I lived there seven years, started a couple of businesses, built a house and learnt to fly. None of The Red Heart is autobiographical, but my experiences whilst in the Northern Territory certainly influenced the book.

Learning to fly was something that I’d always wanted to do, but it seemed an impossible dream. It wasn’t until I went to Alice that I met other people who flew, and realised it was feasible. I could do it too and so I did.  It wasn’t that hard after all.

Getting my Wings

Being awarded with my ‘Wings’ on achieving Restricted Pilot status.

I have always wanted to write, and produced the occasional poem or short story, but didn’t know other people who wrote. Back living in South Australia, I joined the SA Writers’ Centre and after attending a romance writing workshop held by that organisation, the prospect of writing a novel seemed more achievable. Just as learning to fly was a case of taking the first step, so was developing my writing skills.

I wrote the first draft in 1988. The eagle-eyed will notice that Kathy and Sarah listen to music cassettes in the car, and those who know detail about aviation will be aware that some scenes pre-date changes in processes have followed satellite and internet technologies. The interaction between Kathy and Alex that occurred in the briefing office wouldn’t happen today.

I picked the story up again in 2013 and made the decision to leave the plot in the 1980s. That meant I didn’t have to do major re-writes, which would have significantly altered some of the plot scenes.

I thoroughly enjoyed writing the story. Part of that relates to getting to know the characters, and part relates to exploring some of the situations and environments that were very familiar. A common edict directed to new writers is to ‘write about what you know’ and this is what I did in this situation. It removed the requirement to research the background, while I learnt about the craft of writing.

What I didn’t expect was that the book would turn into a series. Initially, I thought it would be a stand-alone category romance for a publisher such as Harlequin, but it is too long to fit their requirements, and probably doesn’t fit neatly into any of their outlined categories. I had to explore other publishing options. As I got to know the minor characters, I realised that their stories were waiting to be told as well. Hence, the second book follows Sarah, and the third explores the challenging character of Melissa.

Book Three in the Trilogy

I’m writing the final chapters of the last of the Centralian Trilogy.  This book tells the story of Melissa Gilbert, who was first introduced in The Red Heart.

That may seem surprising because Melissa wasn’t the nicest of people – possibly readers would not have thought that her story warranted telling. She was rude and obnoxious and it was due to her behaviour and fabrications that she and Kathy Sullivan were put in a life-threatening situation when the aircraft Kathy was flying had to make a forced landing in the bush. Melissa had to make a humiliating admission and apology.

I started to wonder about Melissa and what drove her to act the way she did. As I was to learn though, there was more to her than most people realised. Living on Plenty River Station, Melissa and her father did not often get into Alice Springs and as most of her schooling had taking place in Sydney, she never got to know other young people of her own age. Consequently, she remained a bit of a local enigma. What others saw as a haughty reserve was a cover for her true feelings and emotions.

Getting to know her was initially a challenge but I have enjoyed writing the book anyway. A comment from a beta reader who has been assessing the first chapters is that there are significant differences in style between the first and third books and I like to think that it is indicative of a maturing of my craft.

My working title, Picture This – quite likely to change but it gives me a focus, and these photos that have been the background to the structure of my writing.

Can’t wait for the ending to be revealed!

Romancing Melbourne

I moved to Melbourne a few months ago and since then have been looking for new writing connections. I have discovered the Melbourne Writers’ Group and also the local Romance Writers’ Group and have made valuable connections in each. Having the support of like-minded people is so helpful on what is a solo journey. I have also submitted some work (a short story and a couple of poems) to an anthology that will shortly be published by Melbourne Writers with the theme “Ties that Bind”.

I am currently half-way through book three, which will be the last of the series set in Alice Springs. This novel, with the working title of Picture This, features Melissa Gilbert, who was a rather unlikeable character in book one, The Red Heart. Getting to know Melissa has been a challenge and I really had to delve into her backstory in order to understand what motivated her to behave the way she did.

Living in an apartment now instead of a large house with all the gardening and maintenance issues has made writing a little easier in that I now have more time for it. I live quite close to my day job and so have time for a short period of writing in the morning, or at least thinking about the plot lines and where it is taking the story. Perhaps when I have finished the current series, the next book will be set in a bustling metropolis as an interesting contrast.

Sunrise over East Melbourne

View from my balcony at sunrise

Happy to make connections with any other lone writers in Melbourne.

Coming together of like minds

This weekend, I am attending my first conference for the Romance Writers of Australia.  It’s an action-packed program with something for everyone. I’m looking forward to the networking and to all that I will learn – not just about the craft of writing but about the industry.

I am pitchinChampagne-Glassesg to four new publishers, and have spent today collating thoughts and information.  I’ve also gone back to the manuscript for The Red Heart to give it another read through.  It is amazing that even after I have read it numerous times, and spell-checked and edited, and even after the editor engaged by the publisher reviewed the manuscript, that I have still found a couple of typos and grammatical glitches.  As I have read, I also tweaked and done the odd nip and tuck, taking out words or descriptors that really do not add anything of value to the story.  I am embarrassed now thinking of the clumsiness of the original text.  At least I am improving.

I have also added a new thread running throughout the story, expanding on the conflict between the key characters and which will also lead into book two in which I tell Sarah’s story.

The cocktail event on Friday night should be a blast.  I don’t often have an opportunity to bring out the bling but sure will for this occasion. It will set the rest of the conference off with a bit of pizzazz.  Perhaps I’ll even come up with some new story lines.  I’ll have a drink for you.

Flying by the seat of my pants

I love the way that characters develop a life and personality of their own.  Sure we create them initially, but at that point we probably don’t fully understand their attitudes, their sense of humour or how they are likely to react in any given situation.  We don’t know what they are going to do next.  As I sit in front of that sheet of paper or the keyboard, these people develop motivations of their own and I am constantly surprised at what they do.  I am there to keep them focussed, but take their directional journey with them.

That’s not to say that the characters have full rein, as I know in general terms what their purpose is within the story – each character is there for a reason – but I draw the stick figure and the story fleshes that person out.  I enjoy getting to know them as the story progresses.

Some stories flow easier than others and The Red Heart was one of those.  It helped that I had lived for many years in Alice Springs and also that this was where I learnt to fly.  I knew the country from the air, I knew the characters and of course I knew the technicalities of flying.

Today, there are many women who make aviation their career but at the time in which this story was set, there were still barriers to women as pilots.  The attitudes encountered by Kathy were very real.  It is a real buzz for me now therefore to get onto a commercial flight, knowing that there is a woman on the flight deck.

I don’t know where Kathy is now, but perhaps she has progressed to the flight deck, still using Alice Springs as her home base, or perhaps she has settled on Mulga Downs with a brood of young jackaroos and jillaroos.  What do you think she would have done?

keyboard-hands