How many kilos per thousand words?

My recent visit to the writer’s conference in Melbourne fired up my enthusiasm for getting stuck into book two, which is a sequel to The Red Heart.  This has been helped a bit by the fact that my last position was made redundant, freeing me up to write through the day. This has been both good and bad, as I will explain.

I have no idea what this book will be called, but as it focusses on Sarah, who was Kathy’s best friend in The Red Heart, that is what the draft is currently called.  I’m hoping that inspiration for a truly appropriate name will strike when more of the plot is in place. So far, I am only about twenty one thousand words in. Some sections flow freely and my fingers fly over the keyboard, or else pen scribbles over the paper if that is the mode that I have chosen. At other times though, I stare at the half-filled page, wondering what on earth was in the character’s mind when he/she said or did that and just what exactly are they going to do next?

Sigh. Perhaps I’ll have a cup of coffee.  I wander out to the kitchen. Now that I’m  here, perhaps I’m feeling a little nibbly. Why don’t I have any biscuits? Perhaps some crackers? Cheese?  A few almonds? Before long I am rummaging through the pantry cupboard and the fridge. Just as well I don’t keep chocolate in the house. It wouldn’t last long. As is, I scoff whatever I can find.

These are just diversionary tactics dealing with the hiatus in productivity while waiting for that aha moment when you know just what the response of those characters is going to be. In the meantime, I’m stuffing myself with more food than I actually need, especially as the act of writing entails sitting in the one spot for a lengthy period of time with not a lot of physical effort.  Stroking the cat occasionally doesn’t really count.

I’m not quite gaining a kilo for each thousand words but I can see that writing is counter-productive to maintaining a svelte figure.  How do other writers deal with this issue? I can’t be the only one to have encountered this weighty problem.

Fresh and Flirty in Melbourne

Attended my first RWA conference in Melbourne a couple of weeks ago.  It was amazing.  There were over 400 delegates in attendance. That’s an incredible number of people who are currently writing within the various romance genres.

I met some interesting writers, participated in great sessions on a range of technical aspects of writing and publishing, and listened to highly practical advice.  I also had the opportunity to pitch my manuscript to four new publishers.  There are no guarantees of course but at least it is a foot in the door.

On arriving back home, all enthused of course, I decided based on my observation of what is being published at the moment, that my book should probably be a bit longer and so added another chapter and nine thousand words.  In doing so, I introduced a new plot thread and am now happier with the overall plot development.

Work is progressing on the next manuscript, and in fact I wrote the best part of a new chapter while I was in Melbourne. There are time challenges whilst I am in the process of establishing a new business (www.worklifejunction.com.au) but I will try to dedicate a day a week to writing.

I didn’t see a lot of Melbourne but enjoyed the hustle and bustle while I was out and about in the evening, looking for food.  I did not stay at the conference venue, opting instead for more affordable Airbnb accommodation. I was a bit removed from everyone in the evenings, but at least that meant I could get some writing done.

Next year’s conference is in Adelaide, so I will definitely be attending that one.  Should have another novel to pitch by then.

Almost there

Great. I have just put the full stop at the end of another story, except that I haven’t finished. There is still a scene in the middle to write, but at least I know how it ends. Does anyone else write like that, sliding backwards and forwards through the story?

I read like that as well, which is one advantage of physical as opposed to e-books. I start at the front and get to know the protagonists and get the scene and plot established and then I often jump around, reading a bit here and a bit there. I may read the end and then go back and fill in all the gaps. Mostly the entire book gets read in the end. It’s not a very disciplined way of reading I know, but it suits my flibberty-gibbert brain.

This one is a short story to be included in an anthology to be published by Steam E-Reads, promoting their authors.  Well, it’s supposed to be short but I am already running over the maximum word count so some strict editing is in order.  Still, it has been fun to write and I like to think that it’s an improvement on my last.  Hope the readers think so too. It is set in a coastal town and in my mind, it’s located in the vicinity of Robe, one of my favourite seaside places to stay.

2001 West Beach web

Errands to run now but I feel that I have jumped a big hurdle with the ending. Perhaps tonight I can fill in the rest. Does this mirror your experiences as well?